2 Quotes, 1 Motto and a Photograph

I think that the act of reading poetry nowadays is already an archaic, cultural activity. When we read a poem, it is tantamount to going to pioneer village in order to see somebody hammer out a horseshoe. But I would like to imagine that reading a poem would be tantamount to going to an automated factory and watching a robot with lasers carve out a Lamborghini from of a block of titanium.

Christian Bok – The Cage Match of Canadian Poetry

 

Romances were many but, to the dismay of Miss Muffins, the number of marriages was relatively small. British officers were in the army for advancement, which required money and social standing in an army of privilege. A subaltern might have to pay £1,000 for his commission; an aspiring colonel would need £10,000 and a well-connected wife as well. Marriage had to be a practical affair for an officer. Few Canadian dowries were big enough to pay for a commission and still fewer holders of the dowries had sufficiently good connections at the War Office. There was, of course, the consolation that many officers had money and position and, therefore, could make a free choice for their mate. Sometimes, in spite of everything, Miss Muffin and Captain Busbie did marry and he, in turn, became Colonel Busbie. But more often than not, the officers would risk ruining their career and losing their place in London society if they were to marry a colonial girl.

Robert Vineyard – The British Garrison and Montreal Society 1830- 1850

 

 “Justice for all classes; monopolies and privileges for none” – Motto of The Irish Vindicator and Canada General Advertiser

 

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