Verdun Stadium

Was built in the late 60’s. In the 1930’s Mayor Wilson vowed that there would never be private development on the Verdun Waterfront. People used to swim in the river and there were two main boat clubs, but the Polio scare of the late 50’s sent people away from the river.The Auditorium and Natatorium were built as public works projects that were heavily used and loved by the Verdun citizenry. The Stadium was a place for track and field and minor football leagues among other events. When I was growing up it was a field with perhaps 30 rows of wooden bleachers for fans. Verdun in the 50’s and 60’s was a sports crazy city with numerous leagues in all sports – it was common this time of year to see kids in hockey uniforms walking to outdoor rinks where leagues were busy and the general rinks were always packed. The new stadium seemed like a logical idea and it was home to the Montreal Beavers of the Continental Football League in 1966-67 – American football played in Montreal! In ’67 Alouettes placekicker, Gino Berretta, joined the Beavers as it’s well known local star. The League folded after that season and the Stadium remained as an open venue until it was demolished in the ’90’s and one section was sold for a dollar to Concordia where it now stands on the Loyola campus. This paved the way for the condo projects that now stand there, themselves a tale of greed and rule bending discussed elsewhere on this blog.
Here are a couple of black and white infrared shots taken in the mid 80’s.

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2 responses to “Verdun Stadium

  1. For moi, the link to the 2009 discussion, especially the comments on the boat docks that were demolished is very valuable.

    And the debate over just how bad a mayor Bosse was is not to be missed.

    You should do a feature (if you haven’t already) about the cabins on Goat Island off the Lachine Rapids. How the boats got there from Verdun.

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