Port Terminals

Have I said I would like to find paintings or drawings of Turcot Yards, the Interchange, the Falaise Saint Jacques, and environs? Well, the nice thing about blogging is we can share our dreams (smile) and something that is sort of almost like what we want to see. And thanks to the good folks over at Polar Inertia we have another related set.

This is sort of almost like what Turcot Yards looked like during it’s Intermodal era.

Port Terminals: Strategy Analysis Consumption Network Operations

These images are a series of paintings, drawings and photographs depicting the landscape of the global economy. Port Terminals like these are commerce reduced to its essential form, sites built for efficiency only. They are sites that are immense and empty, seemingly still and unmoving, yet incredible volumes of materials move through daily. These container ports are an abstraction of the infrastructure, underlying our cities and suburbs. They are points of consumption and entry. I see landscapes like these as reflections on the values, needs, and dependencies of our culture. Both on the outskirts and fringes, they are essential to our daily lives. I have been interested in large shipping terminals for awhile. I take photos and create paintings reducing the image down to a simplified, essential gesture
on the landscape. They are about weight density and space. The satellite drawings also draw from an objective source and are a search for pattern and structure.

Matthew Cramer

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3 responses to “Port Terminals

  1. I agree, commerce reduced to its essential form. Your paintings have a sense of stillness and space about them. They remind me of the railroad yards I pass over every day on my way to work. There is a beauty in spaces like these. And, as you say:

    “I see landscapes like these as reflections on the values, needs, and dependencies of our culture. Both on the outskirts and fringes, they are essential to our daily lives.”

    Bravo. Keep painting.

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