The Old Bridge At De L’Eglise

This shot is from about 1982.

You only see half of the original swing bridge that was here. When the design was put together for the Turcot Interchange it was decided to fill in one side of the canal so that they would not have to make too long a span across the canal. Luckily, they kept half the bridge. See this post.

This bridge was the main link between the districts of Cote Saint Paul and Saint Henri before the Saint Remi Tunnel was built. And it had to have been pretty busy being a direct link from Turcot Yards to Saint Patrick street.

Here is another taken from a bus in 1998 with Canada Malt Plant in the background.

Here is a drawing from G. Scott MacLeod. There is a surprising lack of drawings and paintings of this area on the net, but this artist has it well covered.

Here are some shots by Roger Kenner taken in 2002.

Closed to shipping in 1970 they had to raise the bridge to allow the new breed of Lachine Canal navigators to pass through.

And the new bridge at Monk boulevard a few hundred feet west getting ready.

The old bridge still stands as a foot/bicycle bridge and a short cut from the new route over Monk.

And here is a list of all the crossings on the Lachine Canal.

From east to west:

  • Rail bridge
  • Bridge (Mill Road)
  • Bridge (Autoroute 10)
  • Rail bridge
  • Wellington Bridge with the closed Wellington Tunnel underneath
  • Des Seigneurs Bridge
  • Charlevoix Bridge with the Line 1 Green in a tunnel
  • Atwater Footbridge
  • Atwater Tunnel
  • Rail bridge
  • Pedestrian bridge
  • St. Rémi Tunnel
  • Bridge (Autoroute 15/Autoroute 20)
  • Côte St. Paul Bridge
  • Monk Boulevard Bridge
  • Pedestrian bridge
  • Bridge (Angrignon Boulevard)
  • Pedestrian bridge
  • Gauron Bridge (two adjacent bridges carrying St. Pierre Boulevard)
  • Bridge (Highway 138)
  • Rockfield Bridge (rail)
  • Bridge (Museum Way)
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2 responses to “The Old Bridge At De L’Eglise

  1. Pingback: Gabor Szilasi « Walking Turcot Yards·

  2. Pingback: On The 37 « Walking Turcot Yards·

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